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Discussion: Do you add yourself in Roleplaying?

Tags: #ZonnoSpark +1 
  • November 28

    Sounds pretty cool. Last game that made me really care about NPCs was the Mass Effect trilogy, and I played that like 3 years ago. I mean, I actually did cry when Garrus died on the ending of my Mass Effect 2 playthrough... that was heavy.... then on my ME3 playthrough it was Mordin... :'(

  • Member
    November 28

    Sarah Lannister said:

    Sounds pretty cool. Last game that made me really care about NPCs was the Mass Effect trilogy, and I played that like 3 years ago. I mean, I actually did cry when Garrus died on the ending of my Mass Effect 2 playthrough... that was heavy.... then on my ME3 playthrough it was Mordin... :'(

    Mordin is a required death but how dare you let the best bro in the universe die?

     

  • Member
    November 28
    Ha, yeah I had the same thought. Mordin was a tear jerker, but Garrus' death is just shameful :p Was it the bees that got him? What a fate for the dude.
  • November 28

    Exactly. It was the bees, so effing unexpected and I barelly had time to mourn him... I could have just loaded a previous save, but his death gave a lot more meaning to my game.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OJUzmhiYsrU

     

    And Mordin is the cutest thing in the universe, omg. He had a good, meaningful death I admit. Still sad though :'(

  • Member
    November 28
    It was that video or one like it I was picturing :D Poor Garrus. When playing an already defined or partially defined character like Shepard or Geralt from Witcher, does it change your approach and necessitate that you add part of yourself in order to better relate? I suppose that goes for a Fallout 4 character as the voice acting could have an impact on your approach. Does that make sense?
  • November 28

    I think it does. In those cases I fell like I have to add a lot of myself in my characters in order to relate to them. My Shepard was a caucasian, red haired, paragon female, which is bascially myself lol. This approach simplify things, as I don't have to worry about breaking character since the character would just do what I would xD
    On subsequent playthroughs I will roleplay as very different Shepherds though. After finishing the game once it's much easier to make different decisions because I know what is going to happen already, so I can just play around with the possiblities. I repeat this pattern in every game, even when I can customise my characters a lot like in TES or The Sims series.

  • Member
    November 28
    That's interesting in that it only becomes easier to RP when you feel more comfortable or have more understanding and can predict a result. I can't remember where now, but I recall reading something about those who hate to be spoiled in a book or movie, vs those who prefer to know what experience they are in for ahead of time. I wonder if a a similar thing goes on when approach a roleplay scenario. To get that initial feeling of comfort it can pay to stay within the comfort zone. It certainly wasn't my first play through in which I rolled a Renegade. That makes me itch thinking about being evil on the first run.
  • Member
    November 28
    I tend to toss some of my little quirks into my Roleplay, particularly the sort people seem to find endearing. It helps add layers to characters. Delicious character lasagna,