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Which is your favorite rpg class(es) and why?

    • 166 posts
    February 4, 2019 5:24 PM EST

    Quest Completed. Pick a Class.

    So, with this topic I would like to hear people's favorite rpg class / classes and why you chose it / them.

    The class can be anything from any game or other rpg/fantasy related content (example: wind mage, blacksmith etc).

    You can list your main favorite class and then one or two secondary ones.

    It 'd be nice to also hear why this type of class is your favorite to roll with.

     

     


    This post was edited by Duvain at February 4, 2019 5:36 PM EST
    • 393 posts
    February 4, 2019 7:49 PM EST

    I'll go for a hybrid class over pure ones wherever it is possible. So rather than any of the following, I'll prefer a mix of two or all of them.

    1. Enthropy or elemental mage with infiltrator traits (stealth, lockpicking, acrobatics, etc.)

    2. Scout/archer with alchemy.

    3. Witch.

    Why? Because I'm not a big fan of melee and like control. I also prefer combinations of classes and races that defeat stereotypes, because cliches are boring.

    • 166 posts
    February 4, 2019 8:51 PM EST

    Justiciar Thorien said:

    Why? Because I'm not a big fan of melee and like control. I also prefer combinations of classes and races that defeat stereotypes, because cliches are boring.

    I can certainly get behind that. I also like my characters to be heavily magic oriented with the exception being rogues / dagger wielding classes but there as well I won't go if they don't have skills like stealth/shadow manipulation/clones and all that.

    • 166 posts
    February 4, 2019 9:13 PM EST

    Since I started the topic I think I 'll give my favorite classes as well.

    1 - Healer. This has always been my No1 pick on mmorpg.

    2 - Necromancer. My first dps / PvP character was a necromancer and since then I always liked this type of mages that could summon things and attack with magic or curses, debuffs etc

    3 - Monks. A martial artist with elemenal and healing abilities? Yes please!

     

    Why: I like healers because *puts on nerd glasses* I 'm pretty good when playing one and I can also control how the things go in a game like pvp, pve, raids etc. My favorite type of Healer is the type that can also diss out some secondary damage and debuffs, last time I played this one in an mmorpg was in Neverwinter. Also healers are pretty good roleplay material.

    Necromancer - Well what can I say summoned creatures, curses, nukes and a few + points of badassery. Dark side is the best side. :P

    Monks - I like martial arts a lot and having a guy kicking ass like that along with elemental or healing abilities sounds pretty good to me. They are also cool for roleplay.

    My ideal class would be something between a healer and a necromancer something like having a guy with two attributes light, dark. Sadly this is kinda hard to find in an online game but at least it's easy to play one in Skyrim or Oblivion. :P


    This post was edited by Duvain at February 24, 2019 3:23 PM EST
    • 750 posts
    February 4, 2019 9:21 PM EST

    Hmmm. It should be mentioned that I usually (60% of the times?) think about a character before thinking about class. Regardless, these are my top three classes, and usually, on my first playthrough, I always go with the first listed, my favorite.

    Paladin: My "playstyle" or rather roleplay as Paladins is usually as an agent of faith and, on party-based RPGs, a leader by chance more often than by choice. They are highly devoted to their beliefs and their ideals, and Heaven-bent on destroying agents of chaos and evil in the world. Capable of inspiring great devotion to a goal amongst those who follow him, even if not always to the Paladin's personal ideals, a Paladin is a beacon of fortitude and righteousness in a chaotic, often dangerous world. Nine times out of ten, my Paladins are heroes of the people, your usual fantastical heroes.

    I like to play around with how they got where they are and the conditions of their faith: it's not necessarily tied to a God, it can be tied to a cause, like protecting people in a messed up world. For those who have played Pillars of Eternity, think something like the Order of the Kind Wayfarers. When their faith is actually tied to a God, it can also be only to the God itself, not the clerical institution, as the Paladin can judge it "corrupted" or "misguided", to the point where the Paladin can see the institution as an enemy.

    Of course, you can twist these core features into either evil or good. I hardly make purely evil Paladins, at worst I make radicalized characters. Also, my Paladins tend to be middle-aged to old.

    Priest: when I play as Priests, they're usually a support character, moral compass of a party or a preacher to the world. As with Paladins, I don't do evil Priets, and I've never made a radical Priest. My Priests, obviously, are devoted to a God or, in rare cases, to Gods. Like my Paladins, this devotion isn't necessarily tied to a clerical institution, though unlike Paladins I like the idea of playing "reformist" and/or "conciliator" Priests.  My priests also tend to be between middle age and old age.

    I really don't have a lot to add about Priests, as it varies on the character. However, I couldn't talk about this class without bringing up what is definitely my favorite Priest NPC/character ever. The best damn Priest ever made for RPGs: glorious Durance from Pillars of Eternity.

    There are not enough Durance fan arts, by the way. Just 'cause the old bastard ain't pretty... From Deviantart.

     

    His struggling faith storyline is freaking amazing, and I love that he is unapologetically rude, crass and, damn, sometimes sexist even (which is perfect, since he is devoted to a Goddess, lol). He is hilarious, almost comic relief at some points, but as his story progresses, there is... a lot of depht and conflict there. He was quite an unique twist on the sage, the wise man and priest of the party. Very Chris Avellone-y. I wish The Elder Scrolls had more companions like him... or like other Pillars companions. Fuck, they gave Fallout to Obsidian and they taught them how to make a proper RPG and yet they couldn't bother learning it.

    Barbarian: for my "method", or starting point for when I roleplay Barbarians... think fantastical stereotypes. Conan. Viking berserkers. Not-that-bright young hot guys or disgruntled middle-aged drunk men. Again, there's not much to talk about, since as I mentioned, I usually think of character before class.

    However, because I want to, I'll talk about how I approached class for my main character in Skyrim: I didn't. But in hindsight, broadly speaking, he's got elements from all three: a Barbarian's young, reckless bravado-like attitude; the stubborness of a Paladin and later the faith of a Priest. There is more to him than that, but he's not out of the drawing room yet. I'm still reading ancient Nordic legends and myths, after all. However, yes, he is clearly a heroic stereotype, though I'm not sure if I'll make him a flawed and cursed, Ancient Nordic stereotype or a chivalric, germanic stereotype. Or something entirely different.

     

    Class in Fallout

    Although I don't think of classes when playing Fallout, there are clearly playstyles and roleplaying possibilities that fit fantasy classes. Most evidently, we can work with a few factions' concepts. The Brotherhood of Steel are clearly fantasy Paladins, either the people-caring kind of Fallout 3; the zealot, save-humanity-from-itself isolationist hoarders of technology of Fallout 1, 2 and New Vegas; or the radical purists combination of both kinds in Fallout 4 (best thing they've done with the lore in Fallout 4, by the way).

    The old Desert Rangers of Fallout New Vegas were also somewhat of a "Paladins of the Wastes" kind of organization before they were incorporated by the New California Republic.

    I won't talk much about my characters because I still want to publish profiles... some day, eventually.

     

    As a bonus, here's the portrait for my Pillars of Eternity character, Arstan of Aedyr. I really like that name (and him).

     

    • 393 posts
    February 4, 2019 9:24 PM EST

    Duvain said:

    1 - Healer. 

    Surprising, since you seem to like darker fellows.

    Duvain said:

    2 - Necromancer.

    Now that is not a surprise))

    Duvain said:

    3 - Monks. A martial artist with elemenal and healing abilities? Yes please!

    And how about religion?

    Duvain said:

    My ideal class would be something between a healer and a necromancer something like having a guy with two attributes light, dark. Sadly this is kinda hard to find in an online game but at least it's easy to play one in Skyrim or Oblivion. :P

    I think you can also do it in DA.

    • 393 posts
    February 4, 2019 9:32 PM EST

    Mr. Edd said:

    Paladin

    Priest

    Nothing's better than a classic good guy, eh?

  • February 4, 2019 9:35 PM EST

    I tend to go with hybrid magic classes (spellsword), followed by stealth/charisma types and then warrior builds. I've never been much of a fan of hack-n-slash brutes, and prefer subtle and sneaky ways to go about things. 

    I've got no favorite class in the TES series, but in Mass Effect I will always choose Biotic class. Such a badass category, always fun!

    • 750 posts
    February 4, 2019 9:49 PM EST

    Justiciar Thorien said:

    Mr. Edd said:

    Paladin

    Priest

    Nothing's better than a classic good guy, eh?

    Yep, lol. Though I do run evil characters in fantasy, they're not as common. I do run a lot of gray characters, though, and I find it much easier to run evil or gray characters in dystopic settings like cyberpunk and post-apocalyptic: nothing like making miserable people even more miserable!

    And of course, my personal (as in, what I actually think is best for the world) choice in Fallout: New Vegas, and Fallout in general, could be considered "evil" or "cold hearted" by a lot of people.


    This post was edited by Mr. Edd at February 4, 2019 9:51 PM EST
    • 393 posts
    February 4, 2019 9:57 PM EST

    Hmm. That sounds like a tricky difference of mindsets. How do you do that? I can't do evil. Even if I try, somehow they end up light grey. Even my Sith in KotOR was more like Neutral.

    • 166 posts
    February 4, 2019 10:05 PM EST

    @Mr. Edd - I always found paladins very interesting characters I 've seen some people calling them not so interesting when it came to D&D standards roleplaying but I never thought that to be the case. They can make for some cool roleplay since they have to follow a certain way of life and discipline themselves. The gameplay of paladins is pretty cool as well when ti comes to skills/mechanics you can be a tank with healing, support abilities and diss out some decent damage. 

    Even though I play healers a lot I rarely go for a Priest but I can see the interesting aspects of making one. The few times I went for one I make him more a priest of the people rather than a priest of the gods.

    Barbarian, I 'm more of a magic guy myself but the few times I 've played a warrior class simillar to this it is interesting from  gameplay and a roleplay perspective like for example trying to improve due to struggling against mages in battle or being just a guy with a sword but you have to fight monsters etc.

     

    @Thorien - Yeah I 'm more inclined to play healers rather than the darker counterpart which is the necromancers. There is also that thing that everyone who has played healers a lot will have think and said to his party - Go my minions, attack! Sometimes it's just that with a healer your minions are not some random summoned monsters or undead but actual players :D -> insert evil laugh here <- . But yeah like I said my ideal type of class is a mage that will have both the light / dark element and won 't go off the deep end with the dark/necromancy thing and such but keep a balance. Oh and it's been ages since I last played DA I haven't even finished Inquisition just played it for a few hours back then.

    Whenever I play a Monk I never go too hard on faith. I always make them wanderers that have a certain respect for the gods/divine but don't bother themselves too much with faith and all that.


    This post was edited by Duvain at February 4, 2019 10:07 PM EST
    • 750 posts
    February 4, 2019 10:17 PM EST

    Justiciar Thorien said:

    Hmm. That sounds like a tricky difference of mindsets. How do you do that? I can't do evil. Even if I try, somehow they end up light grey. Even my Sith in KotOR was more like Neutral.

    Usually, I build up a messed up situation that shouldn't have happened to my character, because that character couldn't take something like that and be normal again. Something traumatic that breaks the character. It can also be... I don't know how to explain it, over-indulgence, gluttony, greediness?  There are many variations:

    A) I've got nothing else to live for so I'll bring the world down with me

    B) I've got nothing else to live for, so anything between me and my goal (usually revenge) is inconsequential

    C) I've got everything to live for, I've just discovered the pleasuers of the world and it's clocking amazing. This was one of my Fallout 3 characters, your ordinary guy who is forced to leave the security of home only to fall into a world too big for himself.

    That said, I usually don't do evil that would shoot a puppy for the sake of shooting a puppy. Well, C there might, if he is high enough.

    [EDIT] Also, this Cyberpunk soundtrack just screams chaotic character for me.


    This post was edited by Mr. Edd at February 4, 2019 10:23 PM EST
    • 166 posts
    February 4, 2019 10:18 PM EST

    @Thorien - It should be easy to play an evil character. Since you always go for the good choises you just have to pick the exact opposite of what you would originally pick. :P 

    I can play evil characters easilly but I can't say they are my favorites. I find the rational, colder like Mr Edd said and more neutral characters more interesting for example the character  'm playing right now won't dive into an infested dungeon full of undead because their existance might bring harm to people but will go in to become stronger and acquire items also if enough compensation was offered then he would go to risk his life for others. It might sound bad but that 's how the world usually works. I 've never played a lawfull good character if I want to play a good guy I always go for chaotic good.

    Edit: Exactly what Edd said above for evil characters. In my current Skyrim playthrough I go with a very toned down version of the 3rd option making him more of a Neutral guy with a few evil tendencies which is stealing a few interesting things here and there (gotta fill that Dragonborn Gallery up in Solitude :P).

    2nd Edit: Haha I can relate to the pinned comment on the cyberpunk soundtrack video. :D 


    This post was edited by Duvain at February 4, 2019 10:24 PM EST
    • 70 posts
    February 4, 2019 10:59 PM EST
    I really dont like close combat and i have a big thing for magic.

    1. Conjurer.
    2. Necromancer
    3. Illusionist

    Why? Conjurer because i like not having to actively fight myself so i can focus on other things like crowd control. Main game i played this class was Divinity Original Sin. Summon Spider/Elemental/undead and then start coating the floor in oil and setting it on fire or set up a gas explosion while the summon takes all the damage ^^
    Necromancer because i love the playstyle of debuffing and summoning. Mostly used in Skyrim and Dragon's Dogma. We all now how Necromancers work in Skyrim due to seemingly everyone on the site liking Necros so i'll talk about Dragon' Dogma. :D Used spells that would stop enemy movement by holding them down with tendrils. A spell that blinded enemys which led to them just swinging around leaving them open for attacks. A spell that slows the enemy down to a crawl. A spell that created a bubble of poisonous gas deali g massive damage to everything inside, and alot more following those examples.
    Illusionist because of the pure control you have over the battlefield. Used in Skyrim and Dark Souls. The Character in Dark Souls revolved around the spell Rapport. Turns enemys into friends for about 30 seconds. Waa fun to pull out on Invaders who would suddenly get attacked by the big hulking knight in the corner :D.
    • 1454 posts
    February 4, 2019 11:20 PM EST
    So, rather than a specific class I'd say that my favorite type of class is essentially a Healer + Tank combination, with more of a focus on healing myself rather than others. So, logically you'd think that means a Paladin but I'm not really fussed on them in particular (I do like them, but more because they fit my idea for a fun character rather than the class itself). I could happily heal with Alchemy, Restoration/Healing Spells or even 'Drain Health' type spells or enchantments.

    Basically, yeah I love tanking, healing and...well surviving really. That's my main aim with most of my favorite characters though I never say no to DPS type characters.
    • 393 posts
    February 5, 2019 4:57 AM EST

    Duvain said:

    I always found paladins very interesting characters I 've seen some people calling them not so interesting when it came to D&D standards roleplaying but I never thought that to be the case. They can make for some cool roleplay since they have to follow a certain way of life and discipline themselves.

    One issue I have with D&D paladins, it feels like they only follow that special way of life only because of the buffs. Though maybe it's just me. But I like the general idea of a paladin, especially of Auri-El, Stendarr, etc.

    Duvain said:

    Whenever I play a Monk I never go too hard on faith. I always make them wanderers that have a certain respect for the gods/divine but don't bother themselves too much with faith and all that.

    A monk is a person who has abandoned the regular lifestyle to pursue enlightenment through the worship of their chosen deity. Do you really think they can "not bother much with faith"? (Well, unless it's a RL monk.)

    Mr. Edd said:

    Usually, I build up a messed up situation that shouldn't have happened to my character, because that character couldn't take something like that and be normal again. Something traumatic that breaks the character. It can also be... I don't know how to explain it, over-indulgence, gluttony, greediness?  There are many variations:

    A) I've got nothing else to live for so I'll bring the world down with me

    B) I've got nothing else to live for, so anything between me and my goal (usually revenge) is inconsequential

    C) I've got everything to live for, I've just discovered the pleasuers of the world and it's clocking amazing. This was one of my Fallout 3 characters, your ordinary guy who is forced to leave the security of home only to fall into a world too big for himself.

    That said, I usually don't do evil that would shoot a puppy for the sake of shooting a puppy. Well, C there might, if he is high enough.

    [EDIT] Also, this Cyberpunk soundtrack just screams chaotic character for me.

    I often play characters who have been through situations of various degrees of traumatizing. Some of them are really twisted and broken fellows (both of my main Skyrim folks are such ones, for instance). Yet, somehow, none of them has ended up with a mindset like the ones you describe. The most evil I've got is a guy who can sometimes watch someone else commit evil acts and not interfere because it's not his business (which paints him as Neutral), a gal who doesn't help people if they brought their trouble upon themselves, and the gal who killed Grelod the Kind out of uncontrollable rage upon seeing the way she treated the kids. That last one is the closest I've ever got to mindset B.

    I have a really hard time imagining how one could even come to mindset A.

    And while I see the logic behind mindset C, I feel like playing such a character would be boring at the very least and extremely unpleasant at most. Like playing a really plain, dumb looter-shooter with no motivation beyond more loot, in which you must shoot old ladies and puppies for one coin each. Idk, if I woke up one day and found myself living a life of such a fellow, sort of successful and maybe rich, but with most of my wealth earned with someone's suffering, I'd probably commit suicide.

    Duvain said:

    It should be easy to play an evil character. Since you always go for the good choises you just have to pick the exact opposite of what you would originally pick. :P 

    I can play evil characters easilly but I can't say they are my favorites. I find the rational, colder like Mr Edd said and more neutral characters more interesting for example the character  'm playing right now won't dive into an infested dungeon full of undead because their existance might bring harm to people but will go in to become stronger and acquire items also if enough compensation was offered then he would go to risk his life for others. It might sound bad but that 's how the world usually works. I 've never played a lawfull good character if I want to play a good guy I always go for chaotic good.

    Edit: Exactly what Edd said above for evil characters. In my current Skyrim playthrough I go with a very toned down version of the 3rd option making him more of a Neutral guy with a few evil tendencies which is stealing a few interesting things here and there

    It seems easy when you don't want to close the game and never open it again every time you go for such choices.

    Lol, imo, if a character is willing to go into a dungeon full of undead because he thinks he'll become stronger that way, it doesn't tell us he is either good or evil. It tells that he is an idiot. Because normally you train to kill undead, not the other way around.

    Seems like we live in different worlds. I know a lot of people who would help others. Not risk their lives, of course, but help in ways that don't bring harm to themselves. But there are also people who wouldn't help others even if it costs them absolutely nothing. Which may not be much of a difference technically, but is a rather big difference in mindset.

    There may be various reasons why a person may be in the second category, but if they just don't give a fuck, I wouldn't consider them a decent person.

    Playing a character with such a mindset would never fail to make me feel like I just touched something rotten, and that feeling is not much fun. Encountering them IRL often feels the same. Maybe something is just wrong with me.

    • 166 posts
    February 5, 2019 6:32 AM EST

    @Vezrabuto - Greetings fellow Summoner. I 'm also a big fan of Conjurers/Necros and summoner types in general for these reasons as well always loves characters with a lot of CC and curses.

    @Dragonborn - I can certainly understand what you mean here. I am more on the caster/mage type of Healing classes but the 2nd thing I always did was to maximize my survival be it with equipment or skills. I played once a Skyrim build stacking as much Heal Over Time and leeching health/stamina/magicka as possible (just the Enai mods plus one spell from Forgotten Magic) it was ridiculous but fun as well. :P

    @Thorien - Yep I got to agree the D&D paladins either feel like they have a stick up their ass or are in it just for them juicy buffs. :P In general though applying some of D&D roleplay and a bit improvisation paladins can make for some good roleplay.

    Yeah when you put it that way the whole point is to like and have fun with what you play.

    I meant going into the dungeon in order to get actual on site experience because no matter what training you had it's a whole other story going up against the actual thing in an actual life and death situation.

    True many would help others in various situations. But I believe that goes as far as the part where the risk of life is involved and that 's what I was refering to. I take it a bit more realistically when it comes to these types of situations of life and death, I mean imagine you don't have a savegame to load and have only one life, you would think ten times over if you would go into a dungeon full of undead, monsters and who knows what else because Bob lost his sweetroll in there, how he did it noone knows. :P  Same with going to fight a dragon when you already barely escaped a dragon attack that already destroyed a whole city (is Helgen a city? :P), it doesn't even make sense (had to bash a bit on the power fantasy done very wrong in Skyrim don't judge me :D). Also sometimes it feels more realistic or fresh to have such motives behind helping people or doing certain things rather than the casual hero type that has to fight a swarm of undead and monsters with a bloody Spatula Sword sword and a fireball spell just because. There are though other things that can motivate someone to trully risk their lives like vigilantes or priests and other types of simillar characters. Of course there are also those you mention as well that won't give a fuck to help anyone at anytime regardless of the cost but what can you do it's their choise and they are not obliged to help anyone and yeah this type of mindset in not the best even if you don't care at all for the one you help.

    • 166 posts
    February 5, 2019 7:03 AM EST

    @Thorien - Forgot to mention about the Monks. I do pick the belief/religion thing with them but what I 'm playing them as is wanderers that travel in order to experience and understand the mortal world and seek enlightenment through these experiences, Now, if these experiences and knowledge will indeed bring them closer to their beliefs/gods/religion or instead will make them change their views and go away from them that is another story.

    • 33 posts
    February 5, 2019 7:41 AM EST

    This is an interesting topic for me, since I don't play a lot of games with specific character classes or jobs or whatever name you want to call them.

    I tend to play as support characters, since it feels like the pacing is much more relaxed than with DPS, even if the technical aspects can be just as complex if not more. However, one thing that I tend to do is picking classes that are not meant for support and using them as support; on my final playthrough of Dragon Quest 9 my main character was a sort of martial artist/alchemist/healer, who would carry around a bunch of potions and herbs and give them to the rest of my all-warrior party with his superior speed; it wasn't as effective as actual healers would be, but it was fun because of the challenge.

    My secondary go-to, on the other hand, is thieves; not assassins, just characters that specialize in going in sneakily, stealing the enemies' swords off their hilts (or bullets off their pistols), then calling in heavy reinforcements and chuckling from behind as my enemies are massacred in a completely one-sided battle. This, of course, tends to be my main strategy in Skyrim, of course, since the whole "non-Restoration support" concept doesn't really work well there.

    • 44 posts
    February 5, 2019 7:57 AM EST

    1. Ranger

    2. Rogue

    3. Spellsword

     

    Why?

    Well, I have a thing for rangers as I always want a bow. My very first RP character was a Drow ranger I think.  When I'm not ranger I'm rogue with blades. With Spellsword you can use spells, too. With these classes I can be either neutral or chaotic neutral which is fun. I wish I had more detailed answer, but I don't.

    • 393 posts
    February 5, 2019 10:50 AM EST

    Duvain said:

    Yep I got to agree the D&D paladins either feel like they have a stick up their ass or are in it just for them juicy buffs. :P In general though applying some of D&D roleplay and a bit improvisation paladins can make for some good roleplay.

    I prefer playing a priest or just a devout person rather than an actual paladin.

    Duvain said:

    I meant going into the dungeon in order to get actual on site experience because no matter what training you had it's a whole other story going up against the actual thing in an actual life and death situation.

    That makes real sense only if you are a professional undead-hunter or training to be one, or as a part of some trial. Just going to dungeons to get experience? Sounds rather trigger-happy to me.

    Duvain said:

    True many would help others in various situations. But I believe that goes as far as the part where the risk of life is involved and that 's what I was refering to. I take it a bit more realistically when it comes to these types of situations of life and death, I mean imagine you don't have a savegame to load and have only one life, you would think ten times over if you would go into a dungeon full of undead, monsters and who knows what else because Bob lost his sweetroll in there, how he did it noone knows. :P  Same with going to fight a dragon when you already barely escaped a dragon attack that already destroyed a whole city (is Helgen a city? :P), it doesn't even make sense (had to bash a bit on the power fantasy done very wrong in Skyrim don't judge me :D). Also sometimes it feels more realistic or fresh to have such motives behind helping people or doing certain things rather than the casual hero type that has to fight a swarm of undead and monsters with a bloody Spatula Sword sword and a fireball spell just because. There are though other things that can motivate someone to trully risk their lives like vigilantes or priests and other types of simillar characters. Of course there are also those you mention as well that won't give a fuck to help anyone at anytime regardless of the cost but what can you do it's their choise and they are not obliged to help anyone and yeah this type of mindset in not the best even if you don't care at all for the one you help.

    There are so many factors in play in this kind of situation that the character's alignment isn't even among the main ones. For starters, who is our hero? Is he a professional undead-hunter? Or maybe he is a fellow who decided to become a merc yesterday? Or a farmer? Depending on the answer, the degree of risk for him differs quite a lot. Also, how many undead are in that dungeon? One? Ten? A hundred? Are they vampires or draugr or something else? How severe a threat are they posing to people? Is that dungeon located just out of town and people constantly disappear? Or is it somewhere in the wilderness and almost no one has even heard of it?

    In a realistic situation, even the whitest of knights won't go to that dungeon just because some Joe lost a sweetroll in there. Well, unless the knight is a total imbecile or he was going to go to that dungeon anyway.

    As for dragons, there are also questions. Is one a trained warrior or a civilian? Is he expected to fight the dragon alone or with some more folks? Is he a random passerby or is it his duty? Maybe he is a guard? Or a thane of that city? Or he is a mercenary and going to be paid for it? Or maybe he has some personal interest in it? Maybe it's his home town the dragon is attacking, where his family lives? For instance, my main Skyrim fellow is a Thalmor Justiciar and he feels obliged to fight since protecting civilians is his duty. Same way as a firefighter would go into a burning building to save people and a police officer would stand against an armed criminal - because it's their job.

    Casual heroes don't make sense indeed, in any situation. That's why I feel so annoyed when a game treats my character as that, and that's why I go out of my way to make my every character anything but that. In fact, I never do every single quest I encounter, only those that my character would do, what makes sense for them to do.

    Of course it's everyone's choice whether to help someone or not. But it's not really about caring for one you help. It's a general disposition towards the world. When you open a door for a man with a big box, you aren't doing it because you care about the man (most likely it's the first and the last time you see him). It's just the right thing to do. By helping someone you are making the world a little bit better. And also you become a little bit better yourself. It's not important, but a person who wouldn't bother even with such things, probably don't give a fuck about more serious things either. For me such attitude is a reason to not trust a person and expect anything good from them. It doesn't make them evil, but dealing with such ones is usually rather frustrating.

    Think of Bethesda. What feelings does their attitude towards us all make you feel?


    This post was edited by Justiciar Thorien at February 5, 2019 10:51 AM EST
    • 166 posts
    February 5, 2019 4:18 PM EST

    @Thorien - I also rarely ever played a paladin in any game apart from roleplaying I don't like the tank role in general so if I had to choose something along the line of a paladin type character I always go with a battle priest cleric type of guy with the classic heavy armor, mace, healing spells/buffs and some attack type spells from holy/fire attribute. 

    True, what the character is and all other factors you mention make sense and matter a lot in the way you will take care of such situations and whether you will help or not. I 'm always thinking from the perspective of a type of character that has some battle prowess one way or another because games always put you in this position. Also the fact that I 've been playing a lot of chaotic neutral characters for quite a few months now like wizards with the whole lone wolf "seeker of truth" theme behind them has made me to think always from this perspective of the lone character/wanderer.

    Yeah it's disposition and it is also expectations from others on how you will be treated unless of course a person like that realizes exactly what he 's doing and has none and doesn't care about said expectations which might come back to bite them at some point.

    • 166 posts
    February 5, 2019 4:30 PM EST

    @Tirrene - Greetings fellow healer/support. Same here my go to types of characters are the healer/support types and it's true that many times the pacing with them can be much more relaxed compared to dps especially if you have experience with such characters of course there are also the times where all hell will break loose and you 'll have to heal like crazy but that is also part of the fun. This thing of taking a class that is not meant as support and playing it as such is one of my favorite things to do in games, it 's also refreshing to move out of the norm I even did that in MOBA games.

    Oh not gonna lie the first time I played such a pure thief character was in Skyrim and it makes for pretty interesting gameplay since you have to use tactics more compared to casual hack and slash or cutthroat situation compared to a casual rogue/thief dagger wielding character. 


    This post was edited by Duvain at February 5, 2019 4:30 PM EST
    • 166 posts
    February 5, 2019 4:37 PM EST

    @Caladran - After healers/wizards my favorite class are rangers/rogues or an arcane variation of these classes like arcane archers or nightblades they are just very cool and fit easilly to these neutral and chaotic alignments as you mention.

    Well, I 'm also the same when answering why I like summoner/necromancer classes which are my 2nd favorites after healers I don't have any serious reason that I like them it all comes down to the fact that I like their gameplay and mechanics a lot when playing one.


    This post was edited by Duvain at February 5, 2019 4:39 PM EST
    • 274 posts
    February 5, 2019 8:09 PM EST

    Depends entirely upon the game. Some things work better in certain games than others, and I'll generally go towards what's effective and fun.

    Mobile Shooter (e.g. Warframe or Destiny): Gameplay is generally very quick and fluid, less methodical and more improvised, and in both those games my favorite way to play is through area denial (a specific type of CC that does just that: stops enemies from moving through an area), with Destiny's Nightstalker subclass and Warframe's Hydroid, as these allow me to make large groups of enemies into fodder.

    Squad Based RPGs (e.g. Dragon Age or Mass Effect): These are rather slow paced, and are more methodical than not with a fair amount of planning involved and have a large focus on group fighting, and in those cases I play long ranged characters (Archers in Dragon Age, and Infiltrator or Adept in Mass Effect) that can go to a point that overlooks the battlefield and command my squad while picking off targets, rarely ever getting into the thick of things. In some cases there's also stealth options, and I will often use these to sneak around my opponents to find such a vantage point, send my squad in, then flank the enemies, and if not I will carve the path to such a position.

    Dark Souls: I find I have a tendency towards light armored Dex Pyromancers in these games, using a bow to snipe enemies from afar, semi-long weapons like halberds or spears for most encounters, some sort of straight sword or katana weapon for enemies that tend to be closer, and pyromancy for mid-range high damage. Basically a very versatile character who can fight efficiently at all ranges while relying on evasion to avoid damage instead of armor.

    My choices simply depend on what works in that game and can allow me to get through most encounters while having as much fun as possible. The only classes that I don't play well (or at all) are healers (too passive for me) and paladins (mostly just aesthetic, I just wanna stab NPCs with "holier than thou" personalities).


    This post was edited by Ebonslayer at February 5, 2019 8:11 PM EST