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Discussion: Alignments - Lawful Good

Tags: #ZonnoSpark +1  #Alignments 
  • Member
    September 12

    'Ello lads and lasses, ZonnoSpark +1 back with a cheeky miniseries here. This time its about the thing that many of our characters are based around, a strict guideline for what a character should and shouldn't do, and how they feel about it. Yes my friends, I'm talking about alignments, more specifically the traditional DnD list. Each week (or maybe more regularly, depending on popularity) we'll hand round the talking stick and discuss a different one, this week we start with...

    Lawful Good

    The goody-two-shoes alignment, for those who dot their 'I's and cross their 'T's, have never even shoplifted a sweet and always remind the teacher about homework... or are they? As it's often considered a one-dimensional viewpoint, I'm interested to see all your points about it. Get talking folks!

  • September 12

    I think Lawful Good can be very interesting. Codes of Honor, or what you define as a Law are not static. Maybe you have your own laws you take from your homeland, for example, the Wood Elves can steal small items as long as they sell them back to the owners, or so I understand. I would argue that if a Wood Elf truley believed that the law made sense, and was not just using it as an excuse, they could be seen as Lawful Good, even if opererating in a place like Skyrim. But even if you are a traditional, follow every law in the province you're in person, there's room. After all, being Lawful Good is just a facet, just one part, of a character, not a defining trait. Why would it be, when in real life almost none of us go around murdering or stealing, and yet we don't list out how boring we are because the police aren't chasing us. They can have additional, self imposed rules, or, as I said, it could just not matter, and the personality or actions in the past, or any number of things could make the character interesting, complex, and something worth roleplaying as. I guess what I'm trying to get to get across through all this waffling is that it shouldn't be seen as a binding, or something you base your character around at all. It should just be something that when you think about your character, you say "They're... Lawful Good."

  • September 12

    That moment when you post a discussion in a section and the Host of said section post something as well...

    Yeah, Felkros pretty much summed up what I would have said. Though I will add I always find playing Lawful Good harder than Neutral or Chaotic just because it doesn't allow much freedom in a character or at least to me it doesn't.

    Also, off topic question who is the +1 in ZonnoSpark +1?

  • Member
    September 12

    Lawful Good is the best alignment you can be because you can be a real diq with it. A thief stealing bread to feed his family? Cut off his hands! In many ways, the Thalmor of TES V could be seen as LG in alignment, from their pov at least. They believe their way is for the good of all and enforce the law.

  • September 12

    A lawful good character upholds society and its laws, believing that these laws are created to work for the good and prosperity of all. He is both honest and benevolent. He will work within the established system to change it for the better, and strives to bring order to goodness that other good-aligned characters might pool their resources to better the world. A lawful good character combines a commitment to oppose evil with discipline. Most lawful good characters live by a strict code of honor, or by the rules of conduct set down by their deity. They will generally selflessly act by these codes even at the cost of their own life.

    It must however be stressed that blind obedience to local laws is not required by the lawful good alignment. A paladin is not in violation of his alignment if he decides to take up arms against a usurper on behalf of the rightful king, for example, even if that means going against the sedition laws instated by the usurper.

    It should be noted that a lawful good character does not actually have to obey laws, as intimated above. Lawful alignment means that the character prefers a structured life to any other; this typically means that a set of codified laws are followed.

    An incorruptible enforcer, a ruler or politician who acts for the good of his people, and a heroic soldier who strictly obeys the laws of battle are all examples of lawful good characters.

    I bet some people here will know where this is from. 

  • September 12

    I'd argue the opposite, Paws. Someone who cuts a thieves hands off for stealing bread, for the sole purpose of being cruel, would be lawful evil, imo. They work within the laws, but rather than working to do good, they try to do evil, as much as they can. Also, nice writeup Lorc. You make some good points.

  • September 12

    Felkros said:

    I'd argue the opposite, Paws. Someone who cuts a thieves hands off for stealing bread, for the sole purpose of being cruel, would be lawful evil, imo.

    I kind of agree with Phil here. I mean, if you believe in law with your whole being and someone breaks the law, he must be punished. I agree though that cutting off hands might be rather radical for someone who steals a bread to feed a family, but the punishment must be there nevertheless - for the law was broken. Lawful Good character would most likely try to come with adequate punishment that responds to the severity of the crime - or the lack of severity. 

    Phil, I think that what you are talking about here is actually Lawful Neutral, which is ofted described as "the inquisitor". Enforce the law any means neccessary. 

     

  • Member
    September 12

    Felkros said:

    I'd argue the opposite, Paws. Someone who cuts a thieves hands off for stealing bread, for the sole purpose of being cruel, would be lawful evil, imo. They work within the laws, but rather than working to do good, they try to do evil, as much as they can. Also, nice writeup Lorc. You make some good points.

    I get ya. I'm not saying there wouldn't be inner conflict. Karver's paladin might feel utterly wretched and spend the night in prayer, but if he belived that the law and greater good were better served by a maximum penalty for that crime that doesn't make him cruel from his pov. What are the causes of the crime? Was the thief stealing to feed his family because said thief was down on his luck? Or was a an out and out thief who did this for a living? Or what if the city was hard up in an economic crash and there was so little to spare? Theft then becomes a huge issue.

    Like a country with capital punisjment, the morality is fluid. 

  • September 12

    You both bring up some good points. I think you're right, it depends on intention.

  • Member
    September 12

    The Lorc of Flowers said:

    I kind of agree with Phil here. I mean, if you believe in law with your whole being and someone breaks the law, he must be punished. I agree though that cutting off hands might be rather radical for someone who steals a bread to feed a family, but the punishment must be there nevertheless - for the law was broken. Lawful Good character would most likely try to come with adequate punishment that responds to the severity of the crime - or the lack of severity. 

    Phil, I think that what you are talking about here is actually Lawful Neutral, which is ofted described as "the inquisitor". Enforce the law any means neccessary. 

     

    I'm not sure. I mean, there's the good and the greater good. To heal an injured imperial and use the last of your magicka to do it is a good thing. But if using the last of your magicka could potentially allow a greater evil to occur, then doing the small good thing is no longer as clear cut.

    So our LG paladin here believes in law and the greater good. The law in Sentinel says a thief will lose a hand. Times are tough, the Great War's shadow looms large and supplies aren't what they were when Hammerfel was part of the empire. Allowing that thief leniency, while perhaps morally good, is maybe not serving the greater good.