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Tick Tock: RPDisc2

Tags: #FRP:Discussion 
  • February 14

    *for clarification, the “RPDiscX” subtitles mean that the discussions with those titles are part of a series dedicated to the broad topic of Fallout 4 roleplaying. Should I get ideas for a different series, then the subtitle will be different to reflect that*

    Image result for fallout diamond city art

    Despite what the title may lead you to believe, this discussion is not about setting off time bombs in the wasteland. Instead, it is about something more domestic. That is, ‘time-wasting’ in the world of Fallout 4 (and to a lesser extent, the older Fallout games). Though the power-player may ignore this aspect of the game (I’m looking at you CB crew ;) ), more hardcore roleplayers realize the impracticality and lack of realism that comes with questing all day, every day. If the world of Fallout were a reality, it is doubtful that any survivor, even the Sole Survivor, could live through multiple combat-intensive quests each day. That leaves us with the question of how to spend that extra time (if you are indeed going for realism). So, dear reader, answer these questions:

    How do your roleplay-intensive characters spend time between missions?

    Do they fill it with practical things like settlement-building or crafting? Or do you make up activities for them to do?

     

  • February 15

    Something I try to do but often find hard is to not know the lay of the land.  What I do to remedy this is to 'explore' the places I already know around my sleeping ground.  So even if I know where the quest continues, the character doesn't and has to find it.  Working in a radius around my location is a good way to do this.  I go for a walk, shoot the stragglers who managed to survive before and just have a look around.

    Other times, I want to take the time to heal up.  If I had a crippling injury I like to take a break from adventuring as soon as possible and do something else.  Crafting small things is a good way to have a break - it wouldn't do to be building a house with both arms recently broken.  Cooking works too, as does a bit of light farming.

    And sometimes, I just want to chill with the factions - Most of them may not be very talkative spouting only one line when I try to talk to them, but it's nice to take an in depth look around the Prydwen and the Railroad before I ultimately destroy them for the Institute (or whatever order for the faction I'm playing with).  It also helps to make it much more signifcant when they do eventually go up in flames.

     

  • Member
    February 15

    I normally cling to organization, settlement building, and settlement decorating to give it a more realistic feel of what a town would look like. I just kind of take my time with it and enjoy it putting time into detail and taking breaks to catch up with settlers or do some practice shooting with various weapons

  • Member
    February 15

    You know what really makes for a more enjoyable/slow paced roleplay? just walking. Instead of sprinting from objective to objective, taking time to go at a nice easy pace makes the surrounding wasteland so much more surreal. For my Vagabond character I spent like the first hour just wandering on the railroad tracks with no designated purpose at a nice and slow walking pace. Felt like something straight out of a movie

  • February 15

    My sneaky assassin playthrough liked to wander the wasteland alone and poke through the rubble, as much as a way of trying to learn how to reconnect to the strange future he found himself in as anything. My merchant engineer playthrough enjoyed traveling between settlements, ensuring everything was running smoothly, and then returning home to Kingsport Lighthouse, his home base and where his romance (Synth Curie) is based. My "Wasteland Hero" type character typically returns home to the Red Rocket Station, where all of his Companions are based, in order to tinker with his power armor and put it in storage before he goes to visit Piper in Diamond City. My one hundred percent evil character usually wanders over to his large arena, where he assigns slaves to fight for his amusement while he drinks and gets high.

  • February 15

    Joshua Primrose said:

    Something I try to do but often find hard is to not know the lay of the land.  What I do to remedy this is to 'explore' the places I already know around my sleeping ground.  So even if I know where the quest continues, the character doesn't and has to find it.  Working in a radius around my location is a good way to do this.  I go for a walk, shoot the stragglers who managed to survive before and just have a look around.

    Other times, I want to take the time to heal up.  If I had a crippling injury I like to take a break from adventuring as soon as possible and do something else.  Crafting small things is a good way to have a break - it wouldn't do to be building a house with both arms recently broken.  Cooking works too, as does a bit of light farming.

    And sometimes, I just want to chill with the factions - Most of them may not be very talkative spouting only one line when I try to talk to them, but it's nice to take an in depth look around the Prydwen and the Railroad before I ultimately destroy them for the Institute (or whatever order for the faction I'm playing with).  It also helps to make it much more signifcant when they do eventually go up in flames.

     

    Exploration is a great one, and it makes tons of sense, especially if you are camping out and you want to make sure you're safe. And resting to heal is pretty much the one of the main tenets of roleplaying, in TES and Fallout. A little bit of crafting is a nice way to fill the time too. 

    Man, your last paragraph makes me wish there were more options to legitemately just hang with your faction. But if you can do it just fine in your head, I guess it isn't too necessary! 

  • February 15

    MaddMannatee said:

    You know what really makes for a more enjoyable/slow paced roleplay? just walking. Instead of sprinting from objective to objective, taking time to go at a nice easy pace makes the surrounding wasteland so much more surreal. For my Vagabond character I spent like the first hour just wandering on the railroad tracks with no designated purpose at a nice and slow walking pace. Felt like something straight out of a movie

    Did you take any screenshots? I did the same thing on one of my old wanderer characters and some of the scenery is beautiful, especially with mods. 

  • February 15

    Mercurias said:

    My sneaky assassin playthrough liked to wander the wasteland alone and poke through the rubble, as much as a way of trying to learn how to reconnect to the strange future he found himself in as anything. My merchant engineer playthrough enjoyed traveling between settlements, ensuring everything was running smoothly, and then returning home to Kingsport Lighthouse, his home base and where his romance (Synth Curie) is based. My "Wasteland Hero" type character typically returns home to the Red Rocket Station, where all of his Companions are based, in order to tinker with his power armor and put it in storage before he goes to visit Piper in Diamond City. My one hundred percent evil character usually wanders over to his large arena, where he assigns slaves to fight for his amusement while he drinks and gets high.

    I was actually considering putting in questions about DLC activities. For instance, do you ever "fish" in Far Harbor or use the fighting arenas? But you answered anyways, so that helps me out.

  • Member
    February 16

    I have yet to play a character that actually has - or wants - down time. What'll usually happen is that I'll hit up Diamond City, resupply, craft, sleep, and head out again. Same deal with any game-establishes settlements I may run across in the middle of my trips, since I don't care much for building and managing my own. Sometimes, when I get tired of walking back and forth across the map, I'll dabble in settlement building, but that's player fatigue, not character. I don't even necessarily need a mission, I just need to set out and do something. Find something, shoot something, make something happen. But hey, I do the same thing in Skyrim. I never really roleplay "down time" because down time is boring. It's why, even though I really enjoy Hearthfire, it gets to be a chore after a bit. 

  • February 16

    Legion said:

    I have yet to play a character that actually has - or wants - down time. What'll usually happen is that I'll hit up Diamond City, resupply, craft, sleep, and head out again. Same deal with any game-establishes settlements I may run across in the middle of my trips, since I don't care much for building and managing my own. Sometimes, when I get tired of walking back and forth across the map, I'll dabble in settlement building, but that's player fatigue, not character. I don't even necessarily need a mission, I just need to set out and do something. Find something, shoot something, make something happen. But hey, I do the same thing in Skyrim. I never really roleplay "down time" because down time is boring. It's why, even though I really enjoy Hearthfire, it gets to be a chore after a bit. 

    You say down time is boring, and it is sometimes, but I think that the other responses have made it clear that most players, including me, spend their "down time" doing practical things--building, crafting, etc.--which may not make it "down time" but is still time away from the constant kill loot return loop the game offers. I would have included a question about mods that affect down time, but I thought that might be a bit out of the realm of this group.