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Why do you fantasy?

  • Meh
    • 112 posts
    November 22, 2017 10:08 AM EST

    Zonnonn said:

    The Postman said:

    Everything you said is valid points about Fantasy, but I think to me to comes down to realism. That is my problem with it. It is unrealistic when compared to Sci-Fi which is a genre that has several things in it that are happening right now from Cyborgs/Androids to High-Tech Computers to Robots and beyond. I can physically see all these things, and when I watch a movie with them in it I know that it can be done. Even in Mad Max, I can physically modify my car or truck to look like their vehicles and I even know how their weapons work, except theirs has no recoil which kind of bugs me but oh well. Also, Robots > Dragons.

    Imma shoot two questions off at ya:

    What do you think about more scientifically inspired fantasy? For example, I believe it's the Ringworld series that revolves around magic being generated by ingesting certain metals. It's got more of a chemistry vibe going on, so while it couldn't happen in the real world it is very well explained in terms of that world, and is based on something very present in our world - chemical reactions and the cool stuff that happens because of them.

    And how do you feel about low fantasy? From other comments you seem to have a grievance with the typical high fantasy tropes - elves and dwarves and that. Low fantasy is much more realistic, and some worlds could even pass as a straight medieval setting on the surface. I don't have any examples to bring, but you get my point.

    I wouldn't get into it at first, but after a while, I may get into it, but that depends on the characters and such. Also, I could get into that because like you said it has Chemistry and Chemical reactions which are things that can happen

    After looking up what Low Fantasy is, I did find some example that I like that are considered Low Fantasy, for example, the Connan the Barbarian movies and books are low fantasy, but I like to read them and watch the movies. So my answer would be that I could do Low Fantasy over High Fantasy if it was done correctly.

    • 442 posts
    November 22, 2017 10:19 AM EST

    Zonnonn said:

    ....revolves around magic being generated by ingesting certain metals.

    That sounds a lot like Brandon Sanderson's Mistborn Trilogy (which I quite liked :D)

    Zonnonn said:

    Low fantasy is much more realistic, and some worlds could even pass as a straight medieval setting on the surface. I don't have any examples to bring, but you get my point.

    Joe Abercrombie's First Law Trilogy is fantastic low Fantasy, and a perfect example of what you were talking about (although it got pretty gritty in parts and made feel a bit uncomfortable (I like my books to feel PG-13, and this was most definitely 'R'-ish xD)). I just finished reading Jonathan Stroud's Valley of Heroes, and that comes off almost as a viking story with a supernatural vibe... also pretty good.

    Ultimately, it all boils down to preference. Like why do some people like watching romantic comedies or horror flicks or Disney princes movies or documentaries--there's something in them that strikes a chord with the viewer; something that may not be present in other people. Which is fine... how dull would the world be if we all liked the same stuff ;D

    PS--Tolkein hinted in his stories that the Eagles are a proud race that mind their own business and stay unconnected with things outside their own affairs, but let's be honest, that explanation is worse than no explanation at all (especially considering the fact that Sauron reunited with The One Ring would definitly change their quality of life).

    No, the real answer is that the story would have been significantly less interesting if two hobbits hopped on a feathery airplane and chucked a ring into a volcano xD

    • 442 posts
    November 22, 2017 10:37 AM EST

    By the way, this discussion has made the site's Twitter page :D

  • Meh
    • 112 posts
    November 22, 2017 10:42 AM EST

    You know what the greatest thing about everybody not liking the same thing is? We can debate with others, start a conversation, and question ourselves. My granddad used to say "If you never question others or yourself. You will never anything or get answers you are seeking." Thus, why I created this thread because I wanted to know why people on here loved fantasy so much, and after these conversations, I can say their views are no different from mine to an extent. You are right Shin it does come down to preferences, but if we don't question our preferences then we can't understand our own, you know.

    Also, the PS part made me laugh.

    • 502 posts
    November 22, 2017 11:40 AM EST

    The Postman said:

    I wouldn't get into it at first, but after a while, I may get into it, but that depends on the characters and such. Also, I could get into that because like you said it has Chemistry and Chemical reactions which are things that can happen

    After looking up what Low Fantasy is, I did find some example that I like that are considered Low Fantasy, for example, the Connan the Barbarian movies and books are low fantasy, but I like to read them and watch the movies. So my answer would be that I could do Low Fantasy over High Fantasy if it was done correctly.

    Fair enough mate, I think that's actually quite a common opinion. It's like me and sci fi; I can tolerate something being set in the future and having the appropriate advanced tech that goes with it, but something like the Citadel in Mass Effect with all the aliens and stuff doesn't realy appeal to me (that being said I loved ME3, mainly for the gameplay though. I'm full of contradictions)

    ShinJin said:

    That sounds a lot like Brandon Sanderson's Mistborn Trilogy (which I quite liked :D)

    That was it! I've never actually read it, just heard a lot about it form general fantasy research and stuff. It's a really intriguing concept actually, might have to pick a copy of the first one up if I can find it cheaply.

    Joe Abercrombie's First Law Trilogy is fantastic low Fantasy, and a perfect example of what you were talking about (although it got pretty gritty in parts and made feel a bit uncomfortable (I like my books to feel PG-13, and this was most definitely 'R'-ish xD)). I just finished reading Jonathan Stroud's Valley of Heroes, and that comes off almost as a viking story with a supernatural vibe... also pretty good.

    Vikings you say? Sign me right up! I've been looking for some new stuff to read since I finished ASOIAF, and those 3 recommendations all look promising. I agree with you though about keeping things family friendly, all the sex gubbins in Game of Thrones just felt unecessary to me - just get to the killing already!


    This post was edited by Zonnonn at November 22, 2017 11:43 AM EST
  • Meh
    • 112 posts
    November 22, 2017 11:54 AM EST

    Zonnonn said:

    The Postman said:

    I wouldn't get into it at first, but after a while, I may get into it, but that depends on the characters and such. Also, I could get into that because like you said it has Chemistry and Chemical reactions which are things that can happen

    After looking up what Low Fantasy is, I did find some example that I like that are considered Low Fantasy, for example, the Connan the Barbarian movies and books are low fantasy, but I like to read them and watch the movies. So my answer would be that I could do Low Fantasy over High Fantasy if it was done correctly.

    Fair enough mate, I think that's actually quite a common opinion. It's like me and sci fi; I can tolerate something being set in the future and having the appropriate advanced tech that goes with it, but something like the Citadel in Mass Effect with all the aliens and stuff doesn't realy appeal to me (that being said I loved ME3, mainly for the gameplay though. I'm full of contradictions)

    Wait...hold on that is funny. I have heard that everyone is a bit of hypocrite even yourself pointed that out, but in case that made me laugh.

    • 284 posts
    November 22, 2017 12:22 PM EST

    Can't really say I "love" it, but it's a good way to escape from reality :P

    • 431 posts
    November 22, 2017 2:08 PM EST
    Postman fantasy can be realistic if you view it how it's supposed to be viewed. You keep trying to make it make sense in the laws of our universe, but fantasy is about its own universe. Read that again. It has nothing, I repeat: NOTHING, to do with the world you live in now, at least at face value (Middle Earth clearly has real world inspirations, for example. Not the point). This would be easier to explain if you defined realism, because, as far as I'm concerned, dragons are literally realistic in a fantasy setting. I'm repeating myself at this point.
    • 1226 posts
    November 22, 2017 2:58 PM EST

    John Goblikon said: Postman fantasy can be realistic if you view it how it's supposed to be viewed. You keep trying to make it make sense in the laws of our universe, but fantasy is about its own universe. Read that again. It has nothing, I repeat: NOTHING, to do with the world you live in now, at least at face value (Middle Earth clearly has real world inspirations, for example. Not the point). This would be easier to explain if you defined realism, because, as far as I'm concerned, dragons are literally realistic in a fantasy setting. I'm repeating myself at this point.
    Heck, LOTR is basically "Magic stuff is vanishing, leading to the more tech society of our world" 

  • Meh
    • 112 posts
    November 22, 2017 3:11 PM EST

    John Goblikon said: Postman fantasy can be realistic if you view it how it's supposed to be viewed. You keep trying to make it make sense in the laws of our universe, but fantasy is about its own universe. Read that again. It has nothing, I repeat: NOTHING, to do with the world you live in now, at least at face value (Middle Earth clearly has real world inspirations, for example. Not the point). This would be easier to explain if you defined realism, because, as far as I'm concerned, dragons are literally realistic in a fantasy setting. I'm repeating myself at this point.

    No, shit I know fantasy worlds don't exist on our own, but there should still be some reality to it. Yes, I know Middle-Earth or whatever are based on real places but they have no real laws and rules. Really I have to define realism? That is just sad, anyways Realism defined by me in two questions 1) Can it exist in our own universe? and 2) Does their Universe follow or have Laws and Rules like our own or can be related to a science in our own.

    Examples of question 1 would be Can Dragons exist in our universe? The answer is no. Can Elves exist in our universe? Maybe if there is a good explanation. Can a mage bring a person back from the dead? In theory, he could since there are a lot of different ways people either have escaped death or came in real life due to transplants or something on that line.

    An example of question 2 would be Is Alchemy in Fantasy a Science? Yes, it is pretty much chemistry to be quite frank and is something relatable in our own universe.

    • 442 posts
    November 22, 2017 4:09 PM EST

    You know, I think we are occasionally straying from the OP's main question--why do you personally enjoy the fantasy genre--as opposed to 'try to convince me you're right.' I think this has unintentionally led to some frustration and a few counterproductive remarks.

    Let's stick to the script: explain what it is about the genre you like/love. If you want to address comments that others make, please do so in a constructive and positive way. Tone, folks--it's all about dat tone... let's keep it positive ;D

    • 214 posts
    November 22, 2017 4:13 PM EST

    I've always been in love with different timelines and it's one of the features that brought me closer to Fallout. They say that one of the defineing moments of Fallout timeline is that the transistor was never invented. That could've easily happen in the real world as well if nobody supported the idea. And still, you can find tech in Fallout that puts our world to shame. Just look at Liberty Prime. How far behind that is our "real" world. We could've ended like Fallout if the Cold War took a wrong turn. I never call our world the REAL WORLD, because that in my mind means a world where things always stay the same. Always. Things can always take a different turn and have drastic consequances. That is all I'm gonna write now as I don't know what else to write. Open to a debate however.

  • Meh
    • 112 posts
    November 22, 2017 4:30 PM EST

    ShinJin said:

    You know, I think we are occasionally straying from the OP's main question--why do you personally enjoy the fantasy genre--as opposed to 'try to convince me you're right.' I think this has unintentionally led to some frustration and a few counterproductive remarks.

    Let's stick to the script: explain what it is about the genre you like/love. If you want to address comments that others make, please do so in a constructive and positive way. Tone, folks--it's all about dat tone... let's keep it positive ;D

    Thank Shin for saying this because that was my intent of the thread. Why do you love fantasy? Not hey try to convince me to side with you because your right.

    If I could I would give you some sort of prize, but can't, lol.

    • 431 posts
    November 22, 2017 4:32 PM EST

    The Postman said:

    John Goblikon said: Postman fantasy can be realistic if you view it how it's supposed to be viewed. You keep trying to make it make sense in the laws of our universe, but fantasy is about its own universe. Read that again. It has nothing, I repeat: NOTHING, to do with the world you live in now, at least at face value (Middle Earth clearly has real world inspirations, for example. Not the point). This would be easier to explain if you defined realism, because, as far as I'm concerned, dragons are literally realistic in a fantasy setting. I'm repeating myself at this point.

    No, shit I know fantasy worlds don't exist on our own, but there should still be some reality to it. Yes, I know Middle-Earth or whatever are based on real places but they have no real laws and rules. Really I have to define realism? That is just sad, anyways Realism defined by me in two questions 1) Can it exist in our own universe? and 2) Does their Universe follow or have Laws and Rules like our own or can be related to a science in our own.

    Examples of question 1 would be Can Dragons exist in our universe? The answer is no. Can Elves exist in our universe? Maybe if there is a good explanation. Can a mage bring a person back from the dead? In theory, he could since there are a lot of different ways people either have escaped death or came in real life due to transplants or something on that line.

    An example of question 2 would be Is Alchemy in Fantasy a Science? Yes, it is pretty much chemistry to be quite frank and is something relatable in our own universe.

     

    "fantasy worlds don't exist on our own"

     

    "Realism defined by me in two questions

    1) Can it exist in our own universe?

    2) Does their Universe follow or have Laws and Rules like our own"

     

    So for a fantasy world to be believable, it has to be basically like our world but with a different name? You are utterly missing the point of fantasy.

     

    Also, the reason I asked for your definition of realism was to learn something about your side that needed to be shared in order for a better understanding. This isn't sad. 

     

    Middle-Earth or whatever are based on real places but they have no real laws and rules.

     

    Just because Tolkien doesn't state that the law of inertia is in effect in the preface of Lord of the Rings, it doesn't mean that it isn't there. Do you really expect fantasy authors to list every single natural law from our world as it applies to theirs, as well as every single new natural law that they invented for their story/game/media? What a pointless expectation you have. 

     

  • Meh
    • 112 posts
    November 22, 2017 4:33 PM EST

    DeltaFox said:

    I've always been in love with different timelines and it's one of the features that brought me closer to Fallout. They say that one of the defineing moments of Fallout timeline is that the transistor was never invented. That could've easily happen in the real world as well if nobody supported the idea. And still, you can find tech in Fallout that puts our world to shame. Just look at Liberty Prime. How far behind that is our "real" world. We could've ended like Fallout if the Cold War took a wrong turn. I never call our world the REAL WORLD, because that in my mind means a world where things always stay the same. Always. Things can always take a different turn and have drastic consequances. That is all I'm gonna write now as I don't know what else to write. Open to a debate however.

    I can't really reply to this because I don't know what to say exactly, but I do like this point.

    • 157 posts
    November 22, 2017 5:11 PM EST

    Hey hey - keep the conversation friendly guys! You don't have to agree. But be polite and no personal attacks or insults. That's not the spirit of the site. If discussions degenerate into hurling insults and swearing at each other the discussion will be terminated. 

    Got it? 

    Be nice. It doesn't cost a thing. 

    • 442 posts
    November 22, 2017 9:57 PM EST

    Gentlemen, perhaps we've reached a point where ignoring each other would be most beneficial. Now would be an excellent opportunity to prove to the community that you are above counter-productive remarks and a need-to-have-the-last-word attitude. 

    I've had great interactions with both of you in the past, so I know you are capable of this. It's been a fun discussion so far... I hate to see it move in this direction. 

    • 1450 posts
    November 22, 2017 10:52 PM EST

    The weird thing is that I'm not a huge fan of fantasy. I used to be, was the type to read LotR once a year, every year. I'd also read a lot of Forgotten Realms and Dragonlance. Those are my roots and hard to let go of, but nowadays it's only TES I am into out of the whole genre. At a certain point my interest in fantasy as a genre became replaced with an interest in historical fiction and mythology. I had always enjoyed those things, but it was TES and it's batshit lore that propmpted me to want to learn more about the things hidden beneath the surface or behind the game's inspiration.

    I still enjoy fantasy to some extent, and sometimes find myself wanting to watch the LotR movies again, but I'm more excited by next year's Knightfall than any upcoming flick. Still, it is escapsim and an RPG is, to me, the best way of finding that escape. Mass Effect, Witcher, Jade Empire, KotOR, maybe even Fallout... I guess they all fit into the fantasy genre but are better defined as RPGs. It's not so much that I like the fantasy element as it is that I like story, settings, and characters that make me think or challenge my perspectives.

  • Meh
    • 112 posts
    November 22, 2017 11:10 PM EST

    I really like your response Phil though I am sad to say I honestly don't know how to reply to it.

    • 1450 posts
    November 22, 2017 11:28 PM EST

    You don't need to, Postman. It's clear you are experiencing fair bit of stress and anxiety. While I would prefer it if you and John could shake hands and move on, if that can't happen the best thing to do is take time to cool off. This is a good discussion and many interesting points have been raised. I would hate to see it degenerate and die over something that can be so easily mended. In the meantime, we'll just keep it on topic and moderate any further off-topic or rule-breaking posts.

    • 1450 posts
    November 23, 2017 4:23 AM EST

    Let's stay on-topic, folks :) 

    • 57 posts
    November 23, 2017 5:41 AM EST

    Hello Postman this is a discussion I was interested in since it was posted but I was too busy to give my point of view on the topic.

    First of all I will come out and say that I am a die hard fantasy genre fan. :D

    1) Every person is different and percieves things in a different way than the others, the reason for that has to do with some psychology, sociology, anthropology things which are not needed to be mentioned here. For example you are a realist and want to relate and measure everything that goes out of your understanding of the real physical world you live in with the natural laws of our world whereas someone else doesn't give a damn that in a story, game or something else, lizards are flying or that a guy is shooting fireballs with his hands and do all sorts of weird magic shit :P Heck I could even read for someone in a story that farts rainbows as his ultimate magic attack and be ok with it. :D Also something you find nice / beautiful / attractive might be something that another person will dislike a lot and other such examples I think you get the meaning.

    2) Most people like the fantasy genre because in it there aren't these limitations and laws of the real world. The fantasy genre is not made to be measured with the standards of our world but it is made to surpass our world bend it's laws create new laws and thus create a new world where these new laws are in effect.

    For example let's take a look at the Alchemy in Skyrim. You could say that  one could relate alchemy to chemistry. Well, probably not, the only thing which is simillar is the concept but not the content. I remember reading somewhere (I 'm sorry I don't remember the source I think it was said from the Psijics or in a book related to the Direnni dynasty not sure though) that everything has some magicka in it even the plants and that is why they are able to give effects like fortify magic skills or Invisibility etc. Despite having a magical nature alchemy can be considered scientific material in the world of Skyrim simply because that is what the laws of this world dictate and have nothing to do with our world.

    Well, all in all, what I want to say is that in fantasy settings people can leave behind the dull world they live in everyday with all the natural laws, limitations and go to explore whole new worlds and imagine what it would be like if they were at this place and able to do all sorts of things like magic or riding on top of a flying lizard or become someone else like an adventurer living by his sword, or a traveler / wanderer etc. I think it's better to view the fantasy genre like a journey to an unknown place or world or something like going on vacation from the "real world". Fantasy is not made to be measured by the standards of our world but it is made to be something different and surpass the limitations of our world.

    Now, you not liking fantasy is perfectly fine as I said above at pont - 1 - . Also you taking the initiative to check out what fantasy is all about from others who like the genre is also a really good thing. You can always keep an eye on things coming from this genre and you never know, maybe at some point you will come across something you like and is coming from it or find a middle ground where you will feel comfortable with something of this genre.

    Not sure if this was a good answer and I kinda didn't say what I wanted to say the way I exactly wanted to but the general idea is there (severe lack of sleep doesn't help much eiter :/ if it doesn't make sense somewhere it will be corrected after I get some sleep! :D ).

    Edit: Oh reading it again this one sounds a bit like I was trying to convince that fantasy genre is cool :P but take what I said above mostly as the reason that makes me like the fantasy genre ^_^

    And sorry for the long post!  >_<


    This post was edited by Duvain at November 23, 2017 6:14 AM EST
  • Meh
    • 112 posts
    November 23, 2017 9:14 AM EST

    Duvain said:

    Hello Postman this is a discussion I was interested in since it was posted but I was too busy to give my point of view on the topic.

    First of all I will come out and say that I am a die hard fantasy genre fan. :D

    1) Every person is different and percieves things in a different way than the others, the reason for that has to do with some psychology, sociology, anthropology things which are not needed to be mentioned here. For example you are a realist and want to relate and measure everything that goes out of your understanding of the real physical world you live in with the natural laws of our world whereas someone else doesn't give a damn that in a story, game or something else, lizards are flying or that a guy is shooting fireballs with his hands and do all sorts of weird magic shit :P Heck I could even read for someone in a story that farts rainbows as his ultimate magic attack and be ok with it. :D Also something you find nice / beautiful / attractive might be something that another person will dislike a lot and other such examples I think you get the meaning.

    2) Most people like the fantasy genre because in it there aren't these limitations and laws of the real world. The fantasy genre is not made to be measured with the standards of our world but it is made to surpass our world bend it's laws create new laws and thus create a new world where these new laws are in effect.

    For example let's take a look at the Alchemy in Skyrim. You could say that  one could relate alchemy to chemistry. Well, probably not, the only thing which is simillar is the concept but not the content. I remember reading somewhere (I 'm sorry I don't remember the source I think it was said from the Psijics or in a book related to the Direnni dynasty not sure though) that everything has some magicka in it even the plants and that is why they are able to give effects like fortify magic skills or Invisibility etc. Despite having a magical nature alchemy can be considered scientific material in the world of Skyrim simply because that is what the laws of this world dictate and have nothing to do with our world.

    Well, all in all, what I want to say is that in fantasy settings people can leave behind the dull world they live in everyday with all the natural laws, limitations and go to explore whole new worlds and imagine what it would be like if they were at this place and able to do all sorts of things like magic or riding on top of a flying lizard or become someone else like an adventurer living by his sword, or a traveler / wanderer etc. I think it's better to view the fantasy genre like a journey to an unknown place or world or something like going on vacation from the "real world". Fantasy is not made to be measured by the standards of our world but it is made to be something different and surpass the limitations of our world.

    Now, you not liking fantasy is perfectly fine as I said above at pont - 1 - . Also you taking the initiative to check out what fantasy is all about from others who like the genre is also a really good thing. You can always keep an eye on things coming from this genre and you never know, maybe at some point you will come across something you like and is coming from it or find a middle ground where you will feel comfortable with something of this genre.

    Not sure if this was a good answer and I kinda didn't say what I wanted to say the way I exactly wanted to but the general idea is there (severe lack of sleep doesn't help much eiter :/ if it doesn't make sense somewhere it will be corrected after I get some sleep! :D ).

    Edit: Oh reading it again this one sounds a bit like I was trying to convince that fantasy genre is cool :P but take what I said above mostly as the reason that makes me like the fantasy genre ^_^

    And sorry for the long post!  >_<

    Your answer is the best one I have read on here. Thank you.

    That is great that you are a die-hard fantasy fan, jut as I am a die-hard Sci-Fi fan. You and I can see things eye to eye in a matter of speaking.

    1) Right because if we get into Psychology and Sociology we will be here for a while. You are right I always want to relate and measure because it gives me an understanding of how things work, you know, and if someone else can take Fantasy at face value or whatever then great good for them. I just wanted to know why people love it like I do with Sci-Fi. Again, I can understand people gave opposing opinions, hell my brother and I would get into arguments about Fallout and Elder Scrolls or whether Pineapple should be on pizza. I know people may like what I hate that wasn't my intent.

    2) But at the same time, there are some Sc-Fi things that either don't follow our natural world or have been some things that are radical. Again, I get your point and even I have said that, but again being a realist there has to be some sort of natural law that can be compared tours for me to understand it.

    I actually brought that up. Alchemy is fine by me for two reasons 1) It is based on something that really happen and 2) It is Chemistry more or less. Right, but I can relate Magicka to energy since most of Skyrim's alchemy is plant-based, and again that is fine because the concept makes sense to me. I do get your point, but I will also say that even the Shock spells in Skyrim make some sense to me because they could be charging the electrons and stuff around them, again to see this in real life all I have to do is find a Tesla Coil and boom done.

    That is perfectly okay by me and can understand it because I can play games like Fallout, Metro, Day-Z, and others and get lost in them just like someone else can with Skyrim, Morrowind, or whatever and get lost in them. I can understand why people choose to go into a world different from our own just like you said. I get that Fantasy isn't made or was meant to be compared to the real world, but Fantasy sometimes is based on real things and decide to throw all that away, you know. 

    Reall, I wanted answers because ES is way more popular on here then Fallout, so being having a natural curiosity and me always wanting to know answers to questions, which both a curse and a gift, I decided to make this thread to get different answers, and not have someone convinced that their side is superior or better because we have Wizards that can sneeze Rainbows while flying a Dragon while punching a Dwarf, or even call me an idiot and say I have pointless expectations. As mentioned before there are some things I can get behind that is Fantasy such as Conan the Barbarian or Red Sonja, which is Low Fantasy but fantasy none the less. I liked GoT at first with the different religions, houses, and such I was digging it until the Dragons were shown and I was done.

    Nah, your answer is completely fine and one if not the best one I have seen on here. Also, I didn't take it as you were trying to convince me, you actually sounded a lot like David when we would argue. So thank you.

  • November 23, 2017 9:36 AM EST
    I love fantasy. Because in fantasy they serve french fries in Taco Bell.
    • 68 posts
    November 23, 2017 10:43 AM EST

    The Postman said:

    Anyway, I’ve spent forty five drowsy early morning minutes on this and need to go to work. Hopefully it makes sense.

    Man, you say that your father read to you takes me back when my father did the same thing except he read Stephen King's The Stand to me.

    Ah, I was given a Dictionary and a Thesaurus by my granddad so I would quit asking people what this world meant or what is a word that means the same thing as this world. I still treasured my dad's copy of 1984  he gave me when I began High School and my granddad's copy of War of the Worlds which he gave me because I would always read it.

    Yes, your point makes sense to me because I can relate to it. Fantasy has always been part of your life just as Sci-Fi, Horror, Western, and Mystery have been part of my life. As a child myself I would do the similar thing like what you did, but I always wonder how could people let this happen like I wondered how people let 1984 happen or even how people let Brave New World, but now I know how it happens. Really, I guess that is my other problem with fantasy it doesn't give me the answers I seek nor does it question any of my answers if that makes sense.

    Also, yes it did make sense though there were some errors I got what you were saying.

    Sorry for the errors. I'd been up until 2am processing insurance claims and was only half-there until about noon that day.

    I suppose there is an element of suspending disbelief involved in fantasy. When I dive deep into a new fantasy world, I tell myself that, while there are some similarities, the best thing to do is approach that new world as if it has no relation at all to the real world. Especially in very recent sorts of fantasy novels, people like to put extremely human, fleshed out, believable characters in completely alien, fantastic settings. If you'll pardon the expression, it's kind of an entirely different trip from what King does, more like his Dark Tower series than, say, It. At least in my brain-meats.