Memoirs of Mundus: The Amulet of the Lich

  • Memoirs of Mundus: The Amulet of the Lich, An Orc Fairy Tale

    Ian S. McClure

     

    Once upon a time, there was a stronghold in the Jerall Mountains, whose name has been lost thanks to time, and to humans' meddling with our history. Though this stronghold was once mighty, it had fallen on hard times; the mine had run dry, the crop lost to roving goblins. Most of the Orcs there had moved on, but for the Chieftain and his last remaining son. Seeing how his father despaired, the son—whose name was Gurdor—did say to him: “Father, my chief, our stronghold is dying. There is not enough food for even the two of us.”

     

    “Yes, my son.” the chieftain replied sadly. “I have failed my clan. My only hope now is that you may rebuild our clan in your travels. It is time for me to go to the Ashen Forge, where Malacath will judge me as He will.” And Gurdor, sorrowful but understanding, slew him there, and left to find his fate.

     

    Gurdor wandered for many days and many nights, until he found another clan under attack from Nords. Seeing how the Nords were winning, he boldly charged, killing many foes, and roaring: “My fellow Orcs! We shall not lose to these weakling men!” And as the clan watched and heard, their battle-lust returned, and under the leadership of Gurdor they routed the enemy. When the chieftain of this clan heard of how victory was owed to our hero, he hailed him as a mighty champion, and offered to him the hand of one of his daughters, a fine Orc lass named Raka.

     

    Raka was unusual in that she insisted that she would take no husband, unless he consented to be buried with her should she die first. “If our love is true, why would he want to outlive me?” But so infatuated with her was Gurdor that he agreed, swearing an oath of blood.

     

    They lived happily together for years, until Raka fell victim to the disease of Blood Lung, and promptly died. But Gurdor was an honorable Orc, and so went to be buried without a fight alongside her. In the crypt was enough supplies for a week—and then Gurdor would perish of hunger. However, on the third day, a rat came, and attacked the warrior. But Gurdor was yet strong, and he tore it apart with his bare hands. Soon, another rat came, with a strange amulet in its' mouth. It laid the amulet on the first rat, and suddenly it was alive once more, and both fled.

     

    Gurdor took the amulet, and a thought crossed his mind. He laid the amulet on Raka's body, and she too began to breathe again. As she recovered, Gurdor explained the events that had led them to be entombed. Then, they both roared and banged on the doors until the warriors of the stronghold returned, and there was much rejoicing at Raka's revival. When the amulet was examined, it was revealed to have belonged to a foul Lich, and Gurdor gave it to a servant, and told him to keep it safe from any that would use it for evil.

     

    But Raka hid a dark secret. All the love she had for our hero had been false, her heart as cold as the rocks. When Gurdor decided to sail to Betnikh to visit an old friend, Raka took the opportunity. She secretly allied with the ship captain, a puny Breton, and together they threw Gurdor to the sea, where he drowned. But the servant, who had followed in secret, did revive him with the Amulet, and the two returned to the chieftain.

     

    When he learned of Raka's treachery, he was appalled, and assured Gurdor that he could enact his rightful vengeance. And when Raka returned, and lied of her honorable husband's fate, he did appear with a great blade in hand, and beheaded her there, and skinned the Breton alive. The chieftain, regretful of his daughter's actions, relinquished the clan to Gurdor without a fight, and granted him another daughter who was far less cruel. And so Gurdor had fulfilled his father's dying wish, of restoring his clan to glory.

Comments

7 Comments   |   Duvain and 4 others like this.
  • Tenebrous
    Tenebrous   ·  October 29
    Thanks, FlamezSword! These days, I haven't been writing too much Elder Scrolls stuff, but this was fun to make. Glad you liked it!
  • FlamezSword
    FlamezSword   ·  October 29
    I love to see what my fellow writers are up to, and this I must say led me one quite the chase for a moment there. I wasn't expecting that ending whatsoever, but I suppose it's best to expect the unexpected when reading creepy stories :P Well done Tene!
  • Tenebrous
    Tenebrous   ·  October 17
    Added the H17 tag, so that this can be part of the ongoing site event!
  • Duvain
    Duvain   ·  October 15
    A nice and slightly creepy story, liked it! :D
    • Tenebrous
      Tenebrous
      Duvain
      Duvain
      Duvain
      A nice and slightly creepy story, liked it! :D
        ·  October 15
      Thanks! Nice and slightly creepy is perfect for a Grimm-y fairy tale, IMO. This was written in about an hour, so I'm really proud of it despite the short length.
      • Duvain
        Duvain
        Tenebrous
        Tenebrous
        Tenebrous
        Thanks! Nice and slightly creepy is perfect for a Grimm-y fairy tale, IMO. This was written in about an hour, so I'm really proud of it despite the short length.
          ·  October 15
        It gave me the impression of a "good simplicity" when I finished reading if that makes any sense, the story even though short it flowed and it was straight to the point stating all the facts one after another up to the conclusion, which is something I liked.
  • Tenebrous
    Tenebrous   ·  October 15
    For the record, this was inspired by the Grimm's Household Tales story, The Three Snake-Leaves.